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Short-term health insurance in Ohio

Short-term plans can have terms of up to 364 days, but cannot be renewable in Ohio

Buying a short-term plan in Ohio

How long can short-term plans last in Ohio?

Until October 2, 2018, federal regulations limited short-term health insurance plans to no more than three months in duration, and prohibited renewals. The Trump Administration is now allowing for much longer short-term plans, unless a state imposes its own restrictions.

The Ohio Department of Insurance published Bulletin 2018-05 in October 2018, outlining the state’s rules for short-term plans. The bulletin notes that while short-term plans can have terms of up to 364 days, they must be “one-time” policies in order to be exempt from many of the state’s rules for sickness and accident policies. The Department confirmed that “one-time” means that the plans cannot be renewable.

So while Ohio statute does not technically define short-term plans, the policies essentially have to be non-renewable, as they would otherwise have to conform to all of the state’s rules that apply to regular individual major medical plans.

Coverage mandates for short-term plans in Ohio

Bulletin 2018-05 clarifies that even non-renewable short-term plans in Ohio must comply with certain state requirements, including (but not limited to):

  • Internal and External Reviews
  • Provider network details must be disclosed to the consumer
  • Certain care must be covered, including mammograms, Autism Spectrum Disorder treatment, and newborn care.

Which insurers offer short-term plans in Ohio?

  • Companion Life
  • Everest Prime
  • Independence American Life
  • LifeShield
  • National General
  • Standard Life
  • UnitedHealthcare (Golden Rule)

Louise Norris is an individual health insurance broker who has been writing about health insurance and health reform since 2006. She has written dozens of opinions and educational pieces about the Affordable Care Act for healthinsurance.org. Her state health exchange updates are regularly cited by media who cover health reform and by other health insurance experts.