Health reform: a huge victory for women

What's at stake for voters and the women they love?

Pre-existing conditions: rape, C-sections, beatings?

woman preexisting condition

If a woman has survived breast cancer, this is a pre-existing condition. If she is pregnant when she applies, this also is considered a pre-existing condition, just like cancer. Most likely, she will be turned down.

All too often, a woman is closed out of the individual health insurance market because her medical history reveals a pre-existing condition.

For example, if a woman lives in North Carolina, Oklahoma, North Dakota, or Mississippi, and has been the victim of domestic violence, it is perfectly legal for a company to refuse to sell her a policy.

In 45 states, insurers can reject her because she has had a C-section – even if it was medically mandated.

Insurers see “Caesareans or beatings as pre-existing conditions that are likely to be predictors of higher expenses in the future,” the New York Times explains, pointing to Peggy Robertson, a 41-year-old Colorado mother who was denied insurance in 2007. A broker advised the Robertson’s to switch their insurance to Golden Rule (owned by United HealthCare), where they would get a better rate. But when they applied, the company spotted a C-section on Robertson’s record, and sent her a letter, explaining that if she wanted insurance she would have to be sterilized.

If a woman is raped she, too, risks being shunned. When Christina Turner was attacked by strangers, doctors advised that she take HIV medication “just in case.” Insurers then refused to cover her because the HIV drugs “raise too many health questions.” They told her they would reconsider her in three years if she could prove she did not have AIDS.

Turner went without insurance for three years. Other rape victims report being denied because they suffered from post-traumatic stress syndrome.

These are the most shocking cases. Other rules discriminate against millions of women for a long list of commonplace reasons:

  • If a woman has survived breast cancer, this is a pre-existing condition.
  • If she is pregnant when she applies, this also is considered a pre-existing condition, just like cancer. Most likely, she will be turned down.
  • If she is of child-bearing age and has children, this may well viewed as a pre-existing condition, leading to higher premiums.
  • On the other hand, if she is infertile, this too, can be labeled a pre-existing condition.

Not long ago, House Minority Speaker Nancy Pelosi summed up the hurdles: “If you’re a woman, it’s a pre-existing condition.”

Next: Health reform: truly a BFD for women

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